The release of Jack the Ripper Victim Series: The Double Event

Cover_ToFitEPub

The two novel ebook volume, Jack the Ripper Victim Series: The Double Event, was release by IFD Publishing in January 2015. It contains the novels Of Thimble and Threat, about the life of the 4th victim of the Whitechapel murderer, Catherine Eddowes, and Say Anything But Your Prayers, about the life of the 3rd victim, Elizabeth Stride.

This post contains examples of illustrations from the two novels, the book trailer, links to articles and quizzes about the life and times of the two victims, and links to sellers of the book.

The Title of the Book—The night of September 30/ October 1, 1888, Jack the Ripper took two lives in the Whitechapel district of London. Elizabeth Stride was killed about 1:00 AM. A ten minute walk away, and less than an hour later, Catherine Eddowes was killed. The next day, a letter known as the Saucy Jacky postcard was received at the Central News Agency. The message was meant to taunt the police and perhaps the entire city. The writer, who signed the postcard Jack the Ripper, referred to the killings of the night before as “The Double Event.”

Since the murderer was never caught, fascination with the unsolved mystery has been widespread and enduring. But what of the women? Who were they? What was life like for them in London of the time period? What were their struggles, their hopes, their regrets? What of the decisions they made in life might have delivered them into the bloody hands of the Ripper? The two novels within this volume, Say Anything But Your Prayers, about the life of Elizabeth Stride, and Of Thimble and Threat, about the life of Catherine Eddowes, give possible answers to these questions.

Here are links to the book at some of the popular ebook sellers (also available elsewhere):

amazon.com (kindle)

Barnes and Noble

Smashwords

While both of the novels in the book are available in paperback from Lazy Fascist Press, the only ebook available of Say Anything But Your Prayers is in this volume. The paperback of Say Anything But Your Prayers is illustrated as is the version in this volume.  The paperback of Of Thimble and Threat is not illustrated, but the version in this volume is. Here are a couple of the illustrations, the first from Say Anything But Your Prayers, and the second from Of Thimble and Threat. Click on the images to enlarge.

AllThatShedNeed_smallStillInItsHidingPlace_small Say Anything But Your Prayers (link to the paperback on amazon.com)
The beast of poverty and disease had stalked Elizabeth all her life, waiting for the right moment to take her down. To survive, she listened to the two extremes within herself–Bess, the innocent child of hope, and Liza, the cynical, hard-bitten opportunist. While Bess paints rosy pictures of what lies ahead and Liza warns of dangers everywhere, the beast, in the guise of a man offering something better, circles closer. Click here to visit

Of Thimble and Threat (link to the paperback on amazon.com)
The story of the intense love between a mother and a child, a story of poverty and loss, fierce independence, and unconquerable will. It is the devastating portrayal of a self-perpetuated descent into Hell, a lucid view into the darkest parts of the human heart.

Bringing  the Victims Back to Life—These are works of fiction, but they require extensive research to get the environment and characters right. For purposes of storytelling, I did not adhered strictly to the victims’ histories, yet followed as closely as I could and still write a successful tale. I have assigned to my main characters emotional characteristics and reactions that are consistent with their time and circumstances.  Wanting to see what the women looked like, and having only mortuary photos to consider, I worked on those old images in photoshop, trying to repair the damage to the womens’ features and breathe a bit of life into them. Below are the results of that effort. The images appear in the two volume ebook. The first is of Elizabeth Stride, and the second is of Catherine Eddowes. Click on the images to enlarge.

ElizabethStrideRevivedCatherineRevived

Look for the 3rd book in the Jack the Ripper Victims Series, A Brital Chill In August, later this year.

Here are links to article’s I’ve written on Ripper related subjects on Saucy Jacky—A Ripper of a Site:

Alan M. Clark – Jack the Ripper, London’s Murder Weapon

Alan M. Clark – The Mysteries of Elizabeth Stride

Below are links to 2 quizzes I created on Goodreads for the book. Test your knowledge of the women who suffered at the hands of Jack the Ripper on the deadly night of Sept. 30/Oct. 1, 1888. The quizzes also have a few question about London of the period. Since the answers are based on history, one can score highly without having read the novels.

Goodreads Quiz
The Double Event Quiz 1
taken
2 times
10 questions

 

Goodreads Quiz

The Double Event Quiz 2
taken 2 times
10 questions

Watch the book trailer.

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Long Liz or Not?

The image of the young woman in this animation is one that I encountered many times as I researched Elizabeth Stride’s life for my Jack the Ripper Victims Series novel SAY ANYTHING BUT YOUR PRAYERS, published by Lazy Fascist Press. I’ll refer to the young woman in that photo as a teen in this post because she looks so young. Since I have no proof that it is Stride, I created the animation to help me make a determination.

The image shifts from that of the teen to a portrait I created of Stride from a mortuary photo–see below–one that I created using photoshop in an attempt to see what Stride might have looked like when alive. The mortuary photo is one that I know is an image of the woman. The one of the teen is a three quarter view of the left side of the face, slightly from the bottom, while the one from the mortuary photo is that of the right side, and much more straight on. I flipped the teen photo horizontally. That causes more problems perhaps because all faces are at least slightly asymmetrical. Then I worked to alter the mortuary photo, tilting the head back a bit (there were limitations to my ability to do this) to see a little more of its downward-facing plains. I made the alterations without comparing them to the teen photo. Then I laid one image atop the other and lined up their feature with rotating and scaling the image while avoiding squashing it vertically and horizontally.

It’s not a perfect fit, especially at the ear. The difference might have been that her left ear stood out more prominently from the head than her right one. It seems close, but with all the alterations I made to the photos, the exercise is too flawed to make a determination. It’s interesting nevertheless, so I thought I’d share it.

2ElizabethStrides_small

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

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The Double Event


 

Jack the Ripper terrorized London for several months in the late nineteenth century. The night of September 30, 1888, the murderer took two lives in the Whitechapel district of the city. Elizabeth Stride was killed about 1:00 AM. A ten minute walk away, and less than an hour later, Catherine Eddowes was killed. The next day, October 1, a letter known as the Saucy Jacky postcard was received at the Central News Agency. The message was meant to taunt the police and perhaps the entire city. The writer, who signed the postcard Jack the Ripper, referred to the killings of the night before as “The Double Event.”

The first two novels of my Jack the Ripper Victims Series have been released by Lazy Fascist Press: Of Thimble and Threat (about the life of the 4th victim, Catherine Eddowes), and Say anything but Your Prayers (about the life of the 3rd victim, Elizabeth Stride). This fall, both novels will be released together in one ebook titled Jack the Ripper Victim Series: The Double Event.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

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The Mysteries of Elizabeth Stride

In researching the life of Elizabeth Stride, the third victim of Jack the Ripper, for my novel, Say Anything But Your Prayers, I discovered several fun mysteries beyond the most obvious one concerning the identity of her murderer.  In the process of writing a fictionalized account of her life, it was up to me to make sense of the mysteries, and that meant coming up with reasonable story elements to stand in for missing information. One of the most interesting mysteries in her life that I addressed involves a misidentification of her body while it was at the mortuary. I will get to that shortly. First a smaller mystery.

On the surface, Elizabeth and her husband, John Stride, seemed to have had good opportunities. They opened a coffee shop in London in 1870. Although the shop was moved to two other locations within the city over time, they ran it until 1875 when their ownership of the business was sold. John Stride was a carpenter during a time when London was growing in leaps and bounds. Despite these endeavors, in the end, the couple was impoverished and both spent time in the workhouse.

Concerning the coffee shop—the Strides could have been terrible at business. In researching the possibilities, I discovered another likely explanation: The Ceylon coffee crop, which was the main source for the British empire, was all but destroyed by a fungus known as Coffee rust in the early 1870s. As a result of the damage to the crop, the price of coffee might have become too high.

Concerning John’s carpentry—yes, London was growing by leaps and bounds, but the industrial revolution had eliminated so many jobs throughout the countryside, that the unemployed flooded into the city to find work. Competition for jobs was fierce. Any stain on a worker’s reputation might leave him out in the cold. Victorian London was a challenging environment in which to live and thrive. The possible reasons for a lack of success for John Stride’s carpentry are endless. I chose one that made sense within the context of the tale I was telling and helped further the plot.

Two days after Elizabeth Stride’s death, on Tuesday, October 2, during the inquest into her murder, a woman named Mary Malcolm testified that she’d seen the body at mortuary twice and was certain it was that of her sister, Elizabeth Watts. She said that she met with her sister each Saturday on a street corner to give her financial assistance. She’d been meeting her for that purpose for at least three years, yet on the past Saturday, her sister didn’t show up. Mrs. Malcolm recounted a strange experience she’d had that night. “I was in bed, and about twenty minutes past one on Sunday morning, I felt a pressure on my breast and heard three distinct kisses. It was that which made me afterwards suspect that the woman who had been murdered was my sister.”  This occurrence, coincides approximately with the hour of Stride’s death.

Under questioning by the coroner, Detective-Inspector Ried, and the Foreman of the inquest, Mrs. Malcolms said of her sister, Elizabeth Watts, that she’d once had a policeman as a lover, that she’d lived with a man who kept a coffee shop in Poplar, that she’d gone by the nickname Long Liz, that she was a drunkard who had been arrested more than once for public drunkenness, and that she’d gotten released from jail on one occasion by saying that she was subject to epileptic seizures. All six of these descriptions held true of Elizabeth Stride.

Mrs. Malcolm said that in part she could recognize her sister’s body because the right leg had a small black mark.  “It was from the bite of an adder. One day, when children, we were rolling down a hill together, and we came across an adder. The thing bit me first and my sister afterwards. I have still the mark of the bite on my left hand.”

The Coroner had already received information from other borders at the common lodging where Elizabeth Stride had been living that the body was hers.  He instructed Mrs. Malcolm to go as usual on the upcoming Saturday to the corner where she met Elizabeth Watts to see if her sister turned up.

Elizabeth Watts—who had taken the name of her current husband and was named Elizabeth Stokes—did turn up and when the inquest reconvened on Tuesday, October 23, the woman became a witness, declared herself very much alive, and said many things meant to discredit Mary Malcolm.

Still, there are the six elements of description Mrs. Malcolm gave that fit Elizabeth Stride. I found only weak explanations for this mystery.  Applying the principle of Occam’s razor, the simplest explanation is that Mary Macolm lied, but coincidentally offered up so many descriptions that actually fit Elizabeth Stride that she might have been believed if Elizabeth Stokes had not shown up.

The solution to the mystery that I chose seems to be the next-simplest, and helped me to further develop the character of Elizabeth Stride. I had a lot of fun fitting my solution into the greater puzzle of her life.

Say Anything But Your Prayers, just released by Lazy fascist Press, is the second novel in my Jack the Ripper Victims series, the first being Of Thimble and Threat: The Life of a Ripper Victim, about Catherine Eddowes. Exploring the long gone, but not lost world of Victorian London, has been an immense pleasure for me as I perform research for the books.

I have completed the third novel, as yet untitled, about Mary Ann “Polly” Nichols, and hope to have it out some time next year.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

The artwork with this post: “Her Client” copyright © 2014 Alan M. Clark. Medium: Colored pencil on gray paper. Interior illustration for Say Anything But Your Prayers by Alan M. Clark – Lazy Fascist Press.

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Dilation Exercise 112

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. It uses an illustration from his new novel, Say Anything But Your Prayers, released today by Lazy Fascist Press, and is inspired by the story. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. This time, since this image and text are a product of a finished work, please don’t elaborate on the story with comments. Need a further explanation about the Dilation Exercises? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Tears ran down Elizabeth’s cheeks and into her blouse as she took the old woman’s cold, crooked hand into her own.

I might as well have cut her throat, she thought.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “The Old Woman’s Crooked Hand” copyright © 2014 Alan M. Clark. Interior illustration for Say Anything But Your Prayers by Alan M. Clark – Lazy Fascist Press.

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Dilation Exercise 111

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. It uses an illustration from his new novel, Say Anything But Your Prayers, released today by Lazy Fascist Press, and is inspired by the story. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. This time, since this image and text are a product of a finished work, please don’t elaborate on the story with comments. Need a further explanation about the Dilation Exercises? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

Since escaping the life in which she’d pleased little but desperate toads and vindictive cuckolds, Elizabeth was happy that her new lover, Policeman Winders, didn’t treat her like a dirty puzzle.

For the first time, sex was a tender, loving act, which made it all the more shocking that their relationship should end in violence.

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “No Parting Words” copyright © 2014 Alan M. Clark. Interior illustration for Say Anything But Your Prayers by Alan M. Clark – Lazy Fascist Press.

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Dilation Exercise 110

Below you’ll find Alan M. Clark’s weekly Dilation Exercise. Please look at the picture, read the caption, above and below the image, and allow your imagination to go to work on it. If the artwork inspires an idea, please use the comment feature to tell us something about it. Need a further explanation? Go to Imagination Workout—The Dilation Exercises.

When I was younger, drinking was the way to relax and have a bit of fun with my friends.

But what’s happened to everyone now, and who’s the guy that keeps staring at me?

—Alan M. Clark
Eugene, Oregon

If you like Alan M. Clark’s artwork, please try his writing in both short fiction and novels.

Artwork: “Taverns of the Dead” copyright © 2003 Alan M. Clark. Cover illustration for Taverns of the Dead edited by Kealan Patrick Burke – Cemetery Dance Publications.

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